Liberty Review

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Source Cues and Public Support for the Supreme Court

TOM S. CLARK, JONATHAN P. KASTELLEC
AMERICAN POLITICS RESEARCH 43.3 (2015): 504-535

Abstract: It is well known that the public often relies on cues or heuristics when forming opinions. At the same time, leading theories of opinion formation about the Supreme Court see such support as relatively fixed. Using a series of survey experiments, we find source cues significantly influence the public’s support for the Court, including the extent to which individuals believe the Court should be independent from the elected branches. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Law, Politics

The Ethics of Legislative Vote Trading

JOHN THRASHER
POLITICAL STUDIES (2015). ADVANCED ONLINE PUBLICATION. DOI: 10.1111/1467-9248.12205

Abstract: It is argued in this article that legislative vote trading by representatives is both ethically permissible and may be ethically required in many cases. This conclusion is an implication of a thin, general account of representation that requires representatives to vote on the basis of the perceived preferences or interests of their constituents. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Philosophy, Politics

Against ‘Permanent Sovereignty’ Over Natural Resources

CHRIS ARMSTRONG
POLITICS, PHILOSOPHY AND ECONOMICS 14.2 (2015): 129-151

Abstract: The doctrine of permanent sovereignty over natural resources is a hugely consequential one in the contemporary world, appearing to grant nation-states both jurisdiction-type rights and rights of ownership over the resources to be found in their territories. But the normative justification for that doctrine is far from clear. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Law, Philosophy

‘Happy to Have Been of Service’: The Yale Archive as a Window into the Engaged Followership of Participants in Milgram’s ‘Obedience’ Experiments

S. ALEXANDER HASLAM, STEPHEN D. REICHER, KATHRYN MILLARD, AND RACHAEL McDONALD
BRITISH JOURNAL OF SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 51.4 (2015): 55-83

Abstract: This study examines the reactions of participants in Milgram’s ‘Obedience to Authority’ studies to reorient both theoretical and ethical debate. Previous discussion of these reactions has focused on whether or not participants were distressed. We provide evidence that the most salient feature of participants’ responses – and the feature most needing explanation – is not their lack of distress but their happiness at having participated. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Philosophy, Political Theory, Politics, Society

Political Entrenchment and Public Law

DARYL J. LEVINSON, BENJAMIN I. SACHS
YALE LAW JOURNAL (Forthcoming 2015)

Abstract: Courts and legal scholars have long been concerned with the problem of “entrenchment” — the ways that incumbents insulate themselves and their favored policies from the normal processes of democratic change. But this wide swath of caselaw and scholarship has focused nearly exclusively on the formal legal rules governing elections, the processes for enacting and repealing legislation, and the methods of constitutional adoption and amendment. This Article demonstrates that political actors also entrench themselves and their policies through an array of functional alternatives. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Law, Politics

The Effect of State Taxes on the Geographical Location of Top Earners: Evidence from Star Scientists

ENRICO MORETTI, DANIEL WILSON
NBER WORKING PAPER NO. 21120 (April 2015)

Abstract: Using data on the universe of U.S. patents filed between 1976 and 2010, we quantify how sensitive is migration by star scientist to changes in personal and business tax differentials across states. We uncover large, stable, and precisely estimated effects of personal and corporate taxes on star scientists’ migration patterns. The long run elasticity of mobility relative to taxes is 1.6 for personal income taxes, 2.3 for state corporate income tax and -2.6 for the investment tax credit. The effect on mobility is small in the short run, and tends to grow over time. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Economics

Summaries Archive

Recent Posts: Liberty Review América Latina

Por Qué es Antidemocrática la Secesión

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