Against Democratic Education

MARK PENNINGTON
SOCIAL PHILOSOPHY AND POLICY 31.1 (2014): 1-35

Abstract: Critics of educational markets and parental choice argue that the social aspect of education is best reflected when citizens are able collectively to shape it provision though a process of public reasoning, and when instruction in the norms that sustain such reasoning are part of the curriculum. These requirements are thought to imply that the delivery, funding, and regulation of primary and secondary education should be subject to extensive democratic control. This essay takes issue with these claims. Continue reading

Medieval Universities, Legal Institutions, and the Commercial Revolution

DAVIDE CANTONI, NOAM YUCHTMAN
THE QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF ECONOMICS 129.2 (2014): 823-887

Abstract: We present new data documenting medieval Europe’s Commercial Revolution using information on the establishment of markets in Germany. We use these data to test whether medieval universities played a causal role in expanding economic activity, examining the foundation of Germany’s first universities after 1386 following the papal schism. Continue reading

What Should be Taught and Learned in Economics Classes (and Is It?)

JAMES D. GWARTNEY,  JANE S. SHAW
JOURNAL OF PRIVATE ENTERPRISE 24.1 (2013): 73-86

This paper highlights five major deficiencies of the introductory economics courses typically taught in the United States: (1) inattention to the key role of private ownership, (2) neglect of the competitive process, (3) lack of coverage of entrepreneurship, (4) neglect of the insights of public choice economics, and (5) inaccurate portrayal of economic central planning.