Checks and Balances for Democratic Souls: Alexis de Tocqueville on Religion in Democratic Societies

ALAN S. KAHAN
AMERICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT 4.1 (2015): 100-119

Abstract: For Tocqueville, well-balanced souls were as important to freedom as a well-balanced constitution. Such spiritual checks and balances were essential, in his view, for the preservation of political freedom and individual human greatness. Religion was the prime source of such spiritual checks and balances, offering a parallel source for the checks and balances to democracy provided by secular mechanisms such as associations and self-interest well understood. Continue reading

Church and State in the Founding-Era State Constitutions

VINCENT PHILLIP MUÑOZ
AMERICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT 4.1 (2015): 1-38

Abstract: An enormous effort has been dedicated to uncovering the original meaning of the First Amendment’s Religion Clauses, but, surprisingly, little research has been directed toward the founding-era state constitutions on church and state. This article aims to open a field of inquiry by making the church-state provisions of the founding-era state constitutions more accessible. Continue reading

Lockean Toleration and the Victim’s Perspective

GREGORY CONTI
EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF POLITICAL THEORY 14.1 (2014): 176-197

According to Jeremy Waldron, John Locke’s argument for the instrumental irrationality of persecution is fatally flawed. In this paper, Conti offers evidence that Waldron has misread Locke, and that Locke’s views about why persecution generally proves inefficacious have greater plausibility than Waldron allowed. Continue reading

Tocqueville on the Modern Moral Situation: Democracy and the Decline of Devotion

DANA JALBERT STAUFFER
AMERICAN POLITICAL SCIENCE REVIEW 108.4 (2014): 772-782

Abstract: Most scholarship on the moral dimensions of Tocqueville’s analysis of democracy focuses on the doctrine of enlightened self-interest. Surprisingly little has been written about his account of the underlying moral shift that makes this doctrine necessary. Drawing principally on Volume II of Democracy in America, but also on Tocqueville’s letters and notes, the author unearths his fascinating and compelling account of why modern democratic man loses his admiration for devotion and embraces self-interest. Continue reading

Christian Hajjis-The Other Orthodox Pilgrims to Jerusalem

VALENTINA ISMIRLIEVA
SLAVIC REVIEW 73.2 (2014): 322-346

In this article, the author identifies the Christian “hajj” to Jerusalem as an important Ottoman sociocultural phenomenon. She argues that by the nineteenth century the Balkan Eastern Orthodox communities in the Ottoman empire had restructured and reinterpreted their Holy Land pilgrimages to mirror the Muslim hajj to Mecca. Continue reading

The Chief Characteristical Mark of the True Church”: John Locke’s Theology of Toleration and His Case for Civil Religion

AARON L. HEROLD
THE REVIEW OF POLITICS 76.2 (2014): 195-221

Abstract: This essay argues that Locke’s Reasonableness of Christianity provides a morally robust argument for religious pluralism—one which avoids the pitfalls of relativism and official neutrality by elucidating the need for a civil religion of toleration. Continue reading